Monday, October 13, 2014

CDC Changes Ebola Transmission Page

Apparently, the Ebola information that Obama was selling LESS THAN ONE MONTH AGO was crap.

OBAMA: First and foremost, I want the American people to know that our experts, here at the CDC and across our government, agree that the chances of an Ebola outbreak here in the United States are extremely low. We’ve been taking the necessary precautions, including working with countries in West Africa to increase screening at airports so that someone with the virus doesn’t get on a plane for the United States. In the unlikely event that someone with Ebola does reach our shores, we’ve taken new measures so that we’re prepared here at home. We’re working to help flight crews identify people who are sick, and more labs across our country now have the capacity to quickly test for the virus. We’re working with hospitals to make sure that they are prepared, and to ensure that our doctors, our nurses and our medical staff are trained, are ready, and are able to deal with a possible case safely.
The CDC website has changed its criteria for the transmission of Ebola.

"Our experts" at the CDC now say that a cough or sneeze from an infected individual could mean trouble, as in a death sentence.

Remember the good old days, when Ebola was extremely hard to get, requiring contact with contaminated body fluids?

Those were good times.

From Freedom Outpost:

On September 11, 2014, here’s what the CDC’s Questions and Answers on Ebola page said about transmission of the virus:

How is Ebola spread?

The virus is spread through direct contact (through broken skin or mucous membranes) with blood and body fluids (urine, feces, saliva, vomit, and semen) of a person who is sick with Ebola, or with objects (like needles) that have been contaminated with the virus. Ebola is not spread through the air or by water or, in general, by food; however, in Africa, Ebola may be spread as a result of handling bushmeat (wild animals hunted for food) and contact with infected bats.
Here’s what the CDC’s Q&As on Transmission page says now (the page was updated on September 22, 2014):
Can Ebola spread by coughing? By sneezing?

Unlike respiratory illnesses like measles or chickenpox, which can be transmitted by virus particles that remain suspended in the air after an infected person coughs or sneezes, Ebola is transmitted by direct contact with body fluids of a person who has symptoms of Ebola disease. Although coughing and sneezing are not common symptoms of Ebola, if a symptomatic patient with Ebola coughs or sneezes on someone, and saliva or mucus come into contact with that person’s eyes, nose or mouth, these fluids may transmit the disease.

What does “direct contact” mean?

Direct contact means that body fluids (blood, saliva, mucus, vomit, urine, or feces) from an infected person (alive or dead) have touched someone’s eyes, nose, or mouth or an open cut, wound, or abrasion.

Ebola is not hard to get.

Got it?

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